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L’Oasis Lodge, Arusha


L’Oasis is a pretty and atmospheric hotel, with raised thatched bungalows set in beautiful grounds with a pool and plenty of places to sit and watch the Crowned Cranes walk by. It is situated in a small village suburb of Arusha, up a bumpy dirt road that gives you a taste of transportation around Tanzania. Arusha town centre is a half hour walk away, but at night it is advisable to use taxis.


Noise can be an issue at this hotel, as African village life starts to get going around dusk, and the dogs like to join in, but good quality ear plugs should ensure that you have a restful night and avoid waking too early from the cockerels crowing or the Adhan from the nearby mosque.


Food at L’Oasis Lodge


The food service from the restaurant or lounge bar can be a little slow, as every meal is prepared from scratch using fresh ingredients, rather than pre-prepared and reheated; the delay is a small price to pay for quality food.  If you are very hungry, they will willingly provide small entrees to whet your appetite.


The walls of many of the rooms are painted with safari murals, but some guests in the past have noted the lack of safes for valuables.  The management of the hotel often upgrade guests free of charge if they have the availability, and they are in the process of renovating the plumbing and providing individual boilers for each of the bungalows; previously some chalets shared boilers, and there were complaints arising due to the other chalet’s residents using up all the water.



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